Mother helping with search for suspect in fatal shooting

Bryan Bowens, whose last known address was Cul-de-Sac Street, is wanted in connection with the death of 26-year-old Aaron Lamar Fenton, who lived on Lone Oak Park on the city's western edge.
By: 
STEVE ROGERS
Staff Writer

The mother of a shooting suspect is trying to convince him to turn himself in, West Point Police say.

And the incident near Progress Park on the north end of Fifth Street is an example of a problem police thought they had begun to curtail -- outsiders disturbing the neighborhood.

Bryan Bowens, whose last known address was Cul-de-Sac Street, is wanted in connection with the death of 26-year-old Aaron Lamar Fenton, who lived on Lone Oak Park on the city's western edge.

Fenton was found lying in Fifth Street right at the intersection with Progress and taken by ambulance to North Mississippi Medical Center-West Point not long after the 12:30 p.m. call Sunday. Coroner Alvin Carter pronounced him dead about two hours later.

"I have spoken to Mr. Bowens' mother several times. She is well aware of what is going on," Police Chief Avery Cook said Monday afternoon.

"She says she is trying to talk him into turning himself in. We hope he will," added Cook, who said Bowens' mother lives in Florida but indicated her son still is in the West Point area.

Investigators are awaiting autopsy results to get a better idea of the caliber of the weapon used. That autopsy is scheduled for Tuesday at the state Crime Lab.

Cook said officers found one shell casing in the area, but it was some distance from where Fenton's body was found so detectives aren't sure the casing is connected to the shooting.

A resident of the area said he saw a man shooting with a rifle, but police have not been able to confirm that, Cook said.

Fenton was in the area with another man in a vehicle. Police have talked to that person, the chief said.

But they aren't sure how Bowens got to or away from the scene or what prompted the shooting.

Meanwhile, the chief is stressing the incident had nothing to do with the Progress Park or the neighborhood.

"This has been the whole problem in that area, outsiders coming in and causing trouble. This had nothing to do with the park, they weren't in the park," Cook stressed, noting none of the people involved lived in the area where Fifth and Progress streets meet.

People gathering in the small park at the intersection have prompted complaints from residents of the quiet streets and in the last two months, police had cracked down.

"The residents have been very cooperative, the kids have cooperated. It's been much better," Cook said.

At a meeting last week, Selectman William Binder, who represents the area, thanked police, saying their efforts had made a difference.

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